Thomas Concannon, Ph.D.

ThomasConcannon 200x300 Thomas Concannon, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Areas of Expertise:

Resource allocation and planning for costly medical technology
Disentangling influences on hospital acquired infections
Improving research and evaluation through stakeholder engagement

contact1 Thomas Concannon, Ph.D.

Education:

Ph.D., Harvard University, Health Policy
M.A., McGill University, Political Science
B.A., University of Massachusetts – Amherst, Political Science
International study, Universitaet Freiburg, History and Philosophy

Biography:

Thomas W. Concannon is focused on evaluating the effectiveness of healthcare strategies for high cost patients. He is principal investigator on projects to compare strategies for regionalization of heart attack care, to assess the role of long term care facilities in inter-facility transmission of healthcare associated infections, and to evaluate the diffusion of high cost medical technologies and interventions. Dr. Concannon currently serves as co-chair of the NIH Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA) Consortium Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) Key Function Committee. He served previously as co-chair of the CTSA program’s CER Stakeholder Forum meetings in May and December 2010. He developed and delivered a curriculum on comparative effectiveness research for the University of California Los Angeles in 2010 and collaborated with other faculty at the Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) to implement a distance-learning curriculum on CER in 2010-2011. He serves as on health care demonstration and implementation projects, including as part of the management team for an ACTION-II network headed by John Snow, Inc., and as a consultant to the CMS ‘CER Public Use Data Pilot Project,’ headed by IMPAQ International.

Dr. Concannon received his PhD in Health Policy from Harvard University. Prior to pursuing his PhD, Dr. Concannon was a consultant at John Snow, Inc., where he worked with Ryan White CARE Act-funded health departments, hospitals and clinics to improve federally-funded care for people living with HIV and AIDS.